Studying In Ireland

  • STUDY in one of the best education systems in the world for higher education achievements
  • BENEFIT from Ireland’s investment in the education system
  • CHOOSE  from over 5000 internationally recognised qualifications
  • ACCESS world-class research opportunities in world-leading programmes
  • CONNECT with career opportunities with leading global companies located in Ireland
  • ACHIEVE your ambitions in Europe’s most entrepreneurial country
  • JOIN the 35,000 international students from 161 countries enjoying Ireland’s vibrant culture
  • LIVE in an English speaking country
  • EXPERIENCE living in one of the friendliest and safest countries in the world
  • The Irish Government invests over 782 million annually in research in Ireland’s higher education institutions. The impact of this funding is that Ireland’s higher education institutions now lead the world in an increasing number of fields.

Ireland is a friendly, safe country. But don’t just take our word for it.

  • In 2010, Lonely Planet named Ireland the most friendly country in the world.
  • The Global Peace Index rates 158 nations worldwide on measures such as conflict, safety and security in society and militarisation. In 2014, it ranked Ireland the 13th most peaceful place on Earth.
  • Ireland’s Higher Education Institutions are absolutely committed to ensuring that visiting students settle in to their new environment and have all the information needed for an enjoyable stay. All our higher education institutions have a designated staff member to whom international students can turn for any assistance.

While Ireland has its own language and distinct cultural identity, English is the universal spoken language and is one of the reasons why so many multinational businesses locate their European base here.

It also makes Ireland a great choice for international students. English is now the global language of business. According to a recent article in the Harvard Business Review more and more multinational companies, including Airbus, Daimler-Chrysler, Fast Retailing, Nokia, Renault, Samsung, SAP, Technicolor and Microsoft in Beijing, are establishing English as their common corporate language in order to facilitate communication across geographically diverse locations and business functions.

What’s more, it’s the language of choice in the technology world. An estimated 565 million people use  English on the internet.

Ireland’s longstanding reputation for high quality education is build on a solid foundation of commitment to excellence. Today we have one of the best education systems in the world and an internationally renowned reputation for academic quality.

34 higher education institutions in Ireland offer an extensive range of over 5000 programmes leading to internationally recognised, quality assured qualifications. International students can choose to meet their education needs in highly respected business schools, centres of scientific and technology excellence as well as renowned language, humanities and arts faculties.

Did you know that Irish people were behind all these life-changing  inventions? The submarine, colour photography, the modern tractor, the guided missile, the nickel-zinc battery, the portable defibrillator, the Gregg system of shorthand speed writing, the modern stethoscope, rubber shoe soles, soda water, a treatment for leprosy, the aircraft ejector seat and chocolate milk!

  • Irish man Robert Boyle is known as the father of chemistry
  • Francis Rynd invented the hypodermic syringe
  • Charles Parsons developed the world’s first steam turbine
  • Ernest Walton, working with John Cockcroft, became the first person to artificially split the atom

The higher education system in Ireland consists of the university sector, institutes of technology and private independent colleges. The entry requirements for international students to higher education are determined individually by each institution and are generally based on national examination performance and English language aptitude.

The friendliness and hospitality for which the Irish people are renowned contributes to the ease with which overseas students adapt to the way of life and in particular, student life in Ireland. The individual sections below cover a number of topics that you should be familiar with before you decide to come to Ireland, when you arrive and while you are here.

Before deciding to study Ireland, you should ensure that you have sufficient funds to cover your costs of living. For students who require a visa, being able to demonstrate this will form part of your application. While you may be able to undertake part-time work during your time here, you should not have to rely on this income to meet all your expenses.

International students engaged in full-time study of at least one year’s duration (on a course leading to a qualification which is recognized by the Irish Department of Education and Skills currently do not need a work permit to work in Ireland.

Students holding a valid  immigration stamp 2  permission will be permitted to work 40 hours per week only during the months of June, July, August and September and from 15th December to 15th January inclusive.  At all other times students holding Immigration permission Stamp 2 will be limited to working 20 hours per week. The permission to work ceases on the expiry of the students Stamp 2 immigration permission.

Degree programme students can get casual work where they are:

  • Registered with GNIB
  • Enrolled on a recognised programme leading to a qualification recognised by the Minister for Education & Skills
  • Attending a full time programme of education at or above NFQ Level 7
  • Undertaking a minimum of 15 hours day time study
  • Getting tuition, between the hours of 8am and 6pm per week for a minimum of 25 weeks per annum
  • On a programme of at least one year’s duration

College students have a wide choice when it comes to accommodation. Some students choose to stay in on-campus accommodation, which is available in many colleges. On-Campus accommodation is always in demand it can be quite expensive and it is difficult to find.

All universities have halls of residence, generally apartments of 4 to 8 students, with a private bedroom and shared kitchen, living room and bathroom. On campus accommodation must be paid in 2 installments, in September and in February. In most campus accommodation, it is not possible to pay your rent on a monthly basis. You will usually have to pay a deposit of one month’s rent in advance, refunded when you leave. Utilities such as heating are usually extra, although several halls of residence include heat and electricity in their initial charge and deduct payment for usage in excess of the average allowed for from the deposit when you leave Universities and colleges will have further details about their accommodation and how to apply.